Your Life Has Meaning Introduction

Permission granted for use by the visually impaired audience only on listen.wels.net.

The WELS Mission for the Visually Impaired presents Your Life Has Meaning: Discovering Your Role in an Epic Story, by Luke George Thompson, published by Northwestern Publishing House, Copyright 2019.


I started writing this book some ten years ago while teaching philosophy and logic at a college in the United States. It was then that I first discussed “Broken Chair” with my students. And ten years later, I’m still having discussions about that song with young adults. I’m indebted to these many students, both the students at the institutions where I taught and the students I now minister to as a campus pastor in Ottawa, Ontario.

But this book really began nearly 20 years ago in Dr. Greg Schulz’ philosophy classes. He introduced me to many of the thoughts in this volume, such as Sartre’s dialogue with Augustine, Sisyphus’ rock, and Nietzsche’s madman. He encouraged me to pursue graduate studies in philosophy. He also helped me find Christ among the philosophers. From the seeds he planted so long ago, he’ll find much has grown.
Luke George Thompson

“Droll thing, life is—that mysterious arrangement of merciless logic for a futile purpose. The most you can hope from it is some knowledge of yourself—that comes too late—a crop of unextinguishable regrets. I have wrestled with death. It is the most unexciting contest you can imagine. It takes place in an impalpable greyness, with nothing underfoot, with nothing around, without spectators, without clamour, without glory, without the great desire of victory, without the great fear of defeat, in a sickly atmosphere of tepid skepticism, without much belief in your own right, and still less in that of your adversary. If such is the form of ultimate wisdom, then life is a greater riddle than some of us think it to be. I was within a hair’s breadth of the last opportunity for pronouncement, and I found with humiliation that probably I would have nothing to say.”
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

“There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark [tower] high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
J. R. R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

“I am writing you a new command; its truth is seen in him and in you,
because the darkness is passing and the true light is already shining.”
1 John 2:8